Wednesday, September 21, 2011

When it comes to the NCAA, when will we have enough?

In case this coffin needed a nail, here's an amazing report by Taylor Branch on "The Shame of College Sports," published in The Atlantic.  Within a few minutes I had seen it on line, two friends had emailed me the link to it.  This is spreading like wildfire.  In a nutshell:
But after an inquiry that took me into locker rooms and ivory towers across the country, I have come to believe that sentiment blinds us to what’s before our eyes. Big-time college sports are fully commercialized. Billions of dollars flow through them each year. The NCAA makes money, and enables universities and corporations to make money, from the unpaid labor of young athletes.

Slavery analogies should be used carefully. College athletes are not slaves. Yet to survey the scene—corporations and universities enriching themselves on the backs of uncompensated young men, whose status as “student-athletes” deprives them of the right to due process guaranteed by the Constitution—is to catch an unmistakable whiff of the plantation. Perhaps a more apt metaphor is colonialism: college sports, as overseen by the NCAA, is a system imposed by well-meaning paternalists and rationalized with hoary sentiments about caring for the well-being of the colonized. But it is, nonetheless, unjust. The NCAA, in its zealous defense of bogus principles, sometimes destroys the dreams of innocent young athletes.

The NCAA today is in many ways a classic cartel. Efforts to reform it—most notably by the three Knight Commissions over the course of 20 years—have, while making changes around the edges, been largely fruitless. The time has come for a major overhaul. And whether the powers that be like it or not, big changes are coming. Threats loom on multiple fronts: in Congress, the courts, breakaway athletic conferences, student rebellion, and public disgust. Swaddled in gauzy clich├ęs, the NCAA presides over a vast, teetering glory.
 This is embarrassing.  Not new, mind  you, but coming from the pen of Mr. Branch, it packs a particularly poignant punch.    So the question is, what will it take to bring down this behemoth?

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